ReadyRosie is an evidence-informed and research-based family engagement and early learning resource. Learn more below about the evidence base, the expected outcomes, and ongoing academic research on the impact of ReadyRosie with families and children.

CURRENT, ONGOING, and UPCOMING RESEARCH

  • Ongoing Penn State study on ReadyRosie’s impact on quality and quantity of language between parents and children
  • ReadyRosie featured in Tap, Click, Read, a synthesis of research on literacy and technology written by Lisa Guernsey (journalist and director of the Early Education Initiative and the Learning Technologies Project at New America) and Michael Levine (child development and policy expert and founding director of the Joan Ganz Cooney Center)
  • Fort Worth Independent School District (TX) research project on the impact of ReadyRosie’s customized video selection (ReadyRosie Share) on family usage rates and student outcomes
  • Beginning Spring 2017 – ReadyRosie is partnering with Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development to research the effectiveness of ReadyRosie in building increased language engagement between infants and caregivers when access to ReadyRosie is done in conjunction with well-child care visits. The study’s lead researcher is the Center’s director, Dr. Dimitri A. Christakis.
  • Beginning Spring 2017 – ReadyRosie is partnering with Dr. Susan B. Neuman, Professor and Chair of the Teaching and Learning Department at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, to integrate ReadyRosie with the World of Words curriculum with schools, families, and children in select public schools in the Bronx.

EVIDENCE and RESEARCH BASE

Research Flyer

  1. “The research literature supports one compelling fact: what students already know about the content is one of the strongest indicators of how well they will learn new information relative to the content.” - Marzano, R. (2004). Building background knowledge for academic achievement. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

  2. “As educators, we need to promote involvement because ultimately a “comprehensive, well-planned partnership between family, school, and community results in higher student achievement” (Epstein, 2001, p. 317).” - Lopez, C. O., & Donovan, L. (2009). Involving Latino Parents With Mathematics Through Family Math Nights: A Review of the Literature. Journal Of Latinos & Education, 8(3), 219-230. doi:10.1080/15348430902888666

  3. “In an ethnographic study of parent participation, Lareau (1987) compared two first-grade classrooms, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a lower-income neighborhood. Although teachers at both schools had similar expectations, parents in the low-income community were less familiar with school curriculum, engaged less in teaching at home, and were less likely to attend school events. The lower-income parents explained that they had less time and flexibility to meet involvement expectations.” - Drummond, K. V., & Stipek, D. (2004). Low-Income Parents’ Beliefs about Their Role in Children’s Academic Learning. Elementary School Journal, 104(3), 197-213.

  4. “[As of 2011], 88% of American adults have a cell phone, 57% have a laptop, 19% own an e-book reader, and 19% have a tablet computer; about six in ten adults (63%) go online wirelessly with one of those devices.” – Zickuhr, K., & Smith, A. (2012). Digital Differences. Retrieved from Pew Internet and American Life http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Digital-differences.aspx

  5. “[A parent survey} found that fewer than 30% of parents reported that teachers advised them on how to help their children in reading and math; over 80% of parents said they would do more if shown effective learning activities to conduct at home.” - Drummond, K. V., & Stipek, D. (2004). Low-Income Parents’ Beliefs about Their Role in Children’s Academic Learning. Elementary School Journal, 104(3), 197-213.

  6. Rich (as cited in Epstein, 2001) stated that “a number of those who propose more intensive parent involvement in learning activities at home suggest that parents can be most effective when they informally introduce their children to skills different from those emphasized at school” (p. 209). Cognitive and intellectual parental involvement as defined by Grolnick, Ryan, and Deci (1991) would be favored, because children are cognitively exposed to stimulating activities or experiences planned by parents. This kind of at-home involvement can accelerate or enhance children’s learning and understanding of mathematics in the real world, for instance, and illustrates parents’ influence on students’ cognitive learning.” - Lopez, C. O., & Donovan, L. (2009). Involving Latino Parents With Mathematics Through Family Math Nights: A Review of the Literature. Journal Of Latinos & Education, 8(3), 219-230. doi:10.1080/15348430902888666

  7. “Two thirds of all children, 80 percent of low-income children, more than 80 percent of black and Latino children, and 93 percent of English language learners are not reading at grade level by the end of third grade.” - Walker, K. , Gooze, R., & Torres, A. (2014). Connecting the Dots: Raising a Reader Builds Evidence Base for Its Parent Engagement and Early Literacy Program. ChildTrends, #2014-60

  8. “Developing, or struggling, readers often lack the experience and confidence to choose books for themselves, sustain reading for extended periods of time, or consistently apply reading strategies across texts. Dormant readers, who possess the reading skills needed for academic tasks, see reading as a school job, but not an activity in which they would willingly engage outside of school.” - Miller, D. (2012). Creating a Classroom Where Readers Flourish. Reading Teacher, 66(2), 88-92. doi:10.1002/TRTR.01109

  9. “Ford, Follmer, and Litz (1998) proposed that the more parents engage in meaningful mathematics with their children, the more these experiences will become positive experiences and a family pastime rather than a chore.” - Lopez, C. O., & Donovan, L. (2009). Involving Latino Parents With Mathematics Through Family Math Nights: A Review of the Literature. Journal Of Latinos & Education, 8(3), 219-230. doi:10.1080/15348430902888666

  10. “Siegler and Ramani (in press; Ramani & Siegler, 2008) reported that children from low-income families who participated in 1 hr of playing a very simple number board game showed substantial gains in their knowledge of number and magnitude.” - LeFevre, J., Skwarchuk, S., Smith-Chant, B. L., Fast, L., & Kamawar, D. (2009). Home Numeracy Experiences and Children’s Math Performance in the Early School Years. Canadian Journal Of Behavioural Science, 41(2), 55-66. doi:10.1037/a0014532